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American Civil War (apr 12, 1861 – may 9, 1865)

Description:

In the United States, the enslavement of black people was a still a continuing business in the southern states which caused hostilities with those in the north. Eventually, a man named Abraham Lincoln was elected President in 1860 on the vow that he would not allow the practice of slavery to develop in the new unorganized territories of the West.

This stance angered slave-traders in the south eventually causing seven states to unite together and declare an independence from the US. These seven became known as the Confederate States of America.

Rather than being recognized as a new nation however, the formation of the Confederate States lead to an all-out war in the April of 1861. Over the next four years, soldiers from the Confederacy in the south would fight those from the Union in the north in what’s known as the American Civil War.

As it happens, the Union had far more resources in terms of men, firearms, and textiles, so after over 380 individual battles, and the deaths of over a million people, the northern states proclaimed victory in 1865.

Following the Civil War, the Confederacy collapsed, slavery was finally abolished throughout the United States, and four million black slaves became free. The war was also a significant turning point for the nation's identity, as now the inhabitants identified themselves as being part of a united America rather than what particular state they were from. As the nation recovered from the worst war in it's history, a new age of industrialism began to rise throughout the country including the construction of large transcontinental railroads and the influx of settlers to the Western territories.

Added to timeline:

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History of Human Civilization
This is a rough history of human migration, advancement, and...

Date:

apr 12, 1861
may 9, 1865
~ 4 years

Images:

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